A man that murdered your mother would attract less vocalized hatred from the online video game community than Metacritic. Therefore, why don’t we use its statistics as the basis for an article subtly summarizing the trends of today’s gaming industry throughout 2012? A pre-Thanksgiving approach is a tad early, it’s true, but the Wii U has already nestled into happy homes and there are but a few big-name releases left for the end of this calendar year. Far Cry 3 may figuratively blow our faces off, although I don’t anticipate these observations to drastically change after another month and a half.

That said, let’s get started:

  • Over half (17) of the 33 games released on any platform in 2012 to receive an aggregated score of 90 or better are iOS titles. Comparatively, only 17 Xbox 360 and PC releases made Metacritic’s much-larger 100 highest-rated titles list as of this writing, with 14 other slots stuffed with PlayStation 3 games. The original Wii sports numbers that are lower still, with no more than 2 of its titles landing on the list.
  • Considering those Top 100 titles, 5 are Xbox 360 exclusives while a mere 2 are unique to the PlayStation 3, and only then if you recognize the PS3′s MLB 12: The Show as an installment separate from the version found on the PlayStation Vita. Additionally, at least half of each system’s exclusive releases are downloadable indie games.
  • The PlayStation Vita had one more game grace the Top 100 charts than the Nintendo 3DS, despite common claims that Sony’s handheld system has far fewer excellent options when compared to its closest competitor.
  • No Wii U launch title currently sits on this Top 100 list. However, with past console debut events in mind, this statistic is not at all surprising.
  • While assessing the Top 10 games released in 2012 for the Xbox 360 and PlayStation 3 separately, Microsoft’s console had more downloadable, indie, and exclusive titles when compared to Sony’s system. Such a statement completely goes against prevailing perceptions about the two major players in the gaming market.

I could use this space to speculate, to make conclusive claims by analyzing the evidence and extrapolate the statistics to foresee the future of this industry, but I’d rather reassign those duties to all of you. Are these findings profoundly surprising or exactly as expected? Can you create any grand statements from a contentious scoring system?! Did Metacritic actually plot to murder your mother? Let me know in the comments below!